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Talk To Frank

What Is Talk To Frank?

The campaign against drugs that has the longest duration in the entire UK is Talk to Frank. But has it actually worked and stopped drug use?

A decade ago a police SWAT team slammed into a peaceful kitchen somewhere in the suburbs and modified the image of drugs education in the United Kingdom for always. Cautions of how drugs could cause you to become disturbed and impassioned calls to say no to the menacing pushers skulking in every single playground disappeared. In came the quirky funny side and a light-hearted attitude.


The first advert presented an adolescent inviting the police to come and arrest his mum because the mum wanted them to talk about drugs. There was also a new message: Drugs are illegal. Talking about the isn't. So talk to Frank."


Frank: A Pleasant Private Drug Counsel

Devised by the advertising agency, Mother, Frank was actually the National Drugs Helpline brand new name. Young people were meant to feel Frank was a helpful elder brother they could trust and from whom they could seek advice on illegal drugs. Entirety from the ventures of Pablo, the canine medications mule, to a visit cycle a mind, distribution centre has been exhibited under the Frank name, making it a natural brand name among the country's youth.


According to the creative director, Justin Tindall, of the advertising agency, Leo Burnett, it was important that Frank was at no time seen in the flesh so that he could never be the victim of ridicule for wearing the incorrect shoes or attempting to be "down with the kids". Even the YouTube videos that spoof Frank are respectful. As there is nothing that remotely suggests Frank is a government project, the campaign is viewed as a first occurrence funded by the government.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.


Most promotions in Europe now concentrate, similar to Frank, on attempting to give fair-minded data to help youngsters settle on their own choices. In places that have harsh penalties for being in possession, pictures/photos of prison cells and embarrassed parents remain common. For example, in Singapore, a recent campaign recently told young people, "You play, you pay."

Above the Influence is a campaign that mixes jokes and warning stories that the federal government has been using in the UK for a long time; it also offers positive alternatives to drugs. The accentuation is on conversing with youngsters in their own particular dialect - one promotion demonstrates a group of "stoners" marooned on a couch. But the scare tactics is still prevalent in majority of the campaigns against drugs around the globe, especially the "descent into hell" which is drug inspired. A good example is a Canadian commercial that appeared recently and formed part of the DrugsNot4Me series in which a beautiful, self-assured young woman changes into a trembling, hollow-eyed skeleton because of "drugs".

Inquire about into a UK anti-drugs movements in the vicinity of 1999 and 2004 proposes promotions demonstrating the antagonistic impacts of medication mishandle can regularly empower youngsters "on the edges of society" to explore different avenues regarding drugs.


Frank was ground-breaking and criticised by Conservative politicians at the time because they felt it suggest that there were some good things to go along with all the bad about drugs.


One primary online promotion educated viewers: "Cocaine makes you feel high and in charge."

Balancing the message is not always easy to get right. Matt Powell, the man behind the cocaine advertisement and then creative director of the digital agency, Profero, currently thinks he formed a too favourable estimate of the attention span of the typical person who browses the Internet. There will be many who could not have seen the adverse effects of the drugs at the end of the animation. The idea behind the ad according to Powell is to make the Frank brand a more honest one by being sincere to teenagers about drugs.

A 67% of the youth say they would ask Frank for advice related to drugs according to the Home Office. A total of 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and a total of 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. For him, this shows that the campaign is very successful.

Though the response is good, it is no evidence that Frank just like other available anti-drug campaigns has discouraged people from indulging in drugs.

Drug usage in the UK has gone around 9% in the decade since the conflict propelled, yet specialists say quite a bit of this is down to a decrease in cannabis utilization, potentially connected to changing states of mind towards smoking tobacco among youngsters.


Frank - What Is It?

FRANK is a state drug education services together settled by the by the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government in 2003. It was designed to lower the rate of both legal and illegal drug use by providing education to teenagers and young people about what the effects of using drug and alcohol could be. FRANK has run lots of media campaigns on radio and the internet.


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Services

FRANK gives the accompanying services to individuals who look for data and/or advice regarding drugs:

  • A website
  • 24/7 anonymous telephone number
  • Email
  • A classified live chat facility, accessible from 2pm-6pm everyday
  • A service to help find appropriate counselling or treatment