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Getting Help - Treatment

Explaining Drug Addiction

Substance dependency is a chronic illness that is identified by uncontrollable substance seeking and use, regardless of the harmful effects and alterations in the brain that can be permanent. These adjustments in the mind can prompt to the hurtful practices found in individuals who take drugs. Drug compulsion is likewise a backsliding illness. Relapse means going back after some time, to using the substance one had stopped using.


Using drugs out of one's volition is the road that leads to drug addiction. However, over time, it becomes increasingly difficult for the person not to do so. Looking for and taking the drugs gets to be distinctly compulsive. This unrelenting craving results from the effects of the drug on the brain over time. Dependency affects regions of the brain that are involved in learning and memory; motivation and reward; and command over behaviour.

The workings of the human brain, coupled with human behaviour are altered by addiction.


Is There Treatment For Drug Dependency?

Yes, yet it's not simple. Since dependency is a chronic illness, individuals cannot just quit using the substances for a day or two and be cured of it. Many of those under treatment need it over a long time or for the rest of their lives.


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Enslavement treatment must help the individual to the accompanying:

  • desist from drug use
  • remain drug-free
  • be a productive member at work, in society and in the family

Essentials Of Successful Treatment

According to scientific research conducted since the mid-1970s, the essential principles listed below should be the foundation of all successful treatment programmes:

  • Though addiction is very complicated, it could heal completely, and it affects the workings of the human brain and human behaviour.
  • There is no particular treatment that is fitting for all.
  • Individuals must be able to access treatment quickly.
  • To be successful, the treatment plan should not focus on the addiction only but the whole person.
  • Adhering to treatment sufficiently long is critical.
  • The prevalently applied types of treatment include counselling and some other therapies that centre on behaviours.
  • Medications are regularly an imperative component of treatment, particularly when consolidated with behavioural therapies.
  • A treatment plan must be evaluated frequently and adapted to suit the changing requirements of the patient.
  • Some other associated mental problems must be taken care of by treatments.
  • Therapeutically helped detoxification is just the primary phase of treatment.
  • Patients do not necessarily enrol for treatment by choice.
  • Medical personnel must supervise any medications taken during the rehab period.
  • A treatment programme must test a patient for hepatitis B and C, TB, HIV/AIDS and other infectious illnesses and educate the patient about things he/she can do to reduce his/her risk of these diseases.

How Is Substance Dependency Treated?

Effective treatment consists of several steps:

  • Detoxification (the way a body is cleaned of toxins and drug residue)
  • behavioural counselling
  • treatment (for opioid, tobacco, or alcohol addiction)
  • Diagnosis and management mental illness associated with drug addiction such as hopelessness and nervousness
  • Avoiding relapse by providing long term follow up care

Using a wide range of treatments tailored to the needs of the patient is a key to success.


During the rehabilitation, both physical and psychological issues are treated. Follow-up care may comprise group or family-based recuperation supportive networks.


How Are Meds Utilised As A Part Of Drug Compulsion Treatment?

Meds can be utilized to oversee withdrawal manifestations, anticipate backslide and treat comorbid conditions.

  • Withdrawal During rehab, taking some prescription drugs assists in reducing withdrawal reactions. Detoxification is just the very first step in the process and not "treatment" in itself. A patient who does not get any additional treatment after completing a detox generally continue their substance use. As revealed by a study of treatment facilities, 80% of the cases of detoxification involved medications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Relapse Prevention Medications can help manage cravings and help patients re-establish normal brain activity. Alcohol addiction, tobacco (nicotine) and opioid (heroin, prescription pain relievers) have medications for their treatments. Scientists are also currently developing additional medications to treat addiction to marijuana and stimulants, like cocaine and methamphetamines. A person who uses more than one substance, which is really typical, require treatment for every substance he/she uses.

How Are Behavioural Therapies Used To Treat Drug Addiction?

Behavioural therapies assist a patient to:

  • change their character and disposition towards the use of drugs
  • Learn to exercise healthy life skills
  • Continue with varying forms of treatment like medication

A patient can get treatment in several different environments using different approaches.

Outpatient treatment is an option where a wide range of programs are available for patients who continue to visit behavioural health professionals regularly. The majority of the programmes incorporate group or one-to-one substance counselling or both these forms.


Different types of behavioural therapy are dished out by these programs, and they include:

  • cognitive-behavioural therapy, that assists a patient to identify, steer clear of, and deal with the circumstances in which he/she is most probable to resort to substances
  • Multidimensional family treatment created for young people with drug abuse issues and their families which addresses a scope of impacts on their drug mishandle designs and is intended to enhance general family working
  • Motivational interviewing, which takes full advantage of the patient's readiness to change and willingness to enter treatment
  • Motivational impetuses (possibility management), which utilizes uplifting feedback to support restraint from medications

Treatment is once in awhile escalated at to begin with, where patients go to numerous outpatient sessions every week. Subsequent to finishing escalated treatment, patients move to customary outpatient treatment, which meets less frequently and for decreased hours every week to help manage their recuperation.


Inpatient or private treatment can likewise be extremely compelling, particularly for those with more serious issues (including co-happening conditions). A licensed inpatient treatment centre provides round-the-clock, structured and comprehensive care, that includes safe accommodation as well as medical attention. Inpatient treatment facilities can use many therapeutic approaches and are usually working toward assisting the patient after treatment to maintain a drug free, crime free lifestyle.


Benefits of taking an inpatient treatment programme:

  • In the period it takes for the patient to recover, usually six to twelve months, the patient becomes a member of the community at the therapeutic facility. The behaviours, understanding and attitude of the addict towards drugs is affected by the whole community, which involves the staff that offer the treatment and those recovering from addiction, as they take up the role of change agents.
  • Shorter-term residential treatment, which ordinarily concentrates on detoxification and also giving early extensive counselling and readiness for treatment in a community based setting.
  • Recovery housing that offers supervised, short-term accommodation for a patient, frequently after other kinds of inpatient/residential treatment. Recovery housing is a great way to help people treatment go back to having an independent life while still having support with things like managing finances, finding employment, and locating support services.

Coping With Joining The Community

The excessive urge to take drugs could be "triggered" by several factors within the brain, as the workings of the brain is altered by drug abuse. It is key for patients in treatment, particularly those treated at prison or inpatient facilities, to learn how to identify, steer clear of, and deal with triggers that they are most likely to experience after treatment.